REVIEW: Andrew Cull’s Remains

The last time The Horror Club had the experience of reading Andrew Cull’s work was his short story, Hope and Walker, and it was a pleasant surprise that we gave five stars. Next up is his debut novel, Remains, which tells the story of Lucy, a mother trying to recover from the trauma of losing her son to an awful event.

Cull has a wonderful style of writing, and in Remains, he doesn’t take wait around to showcase it. The novel is full of everything that you’d find in his work: free flowing prose, wonderful character development and a host of themes scattered throughout.

It’s a study into the development of woman who cannot let go of the past. Lucy revisits the house that her son was murdered in over and over, and in a way, it isn’t a reminder that he was killed there, but that this was a place that they shared their time together. The house represents her lost son, and every time she is drawn to it, it’s because she is drawn to her son.

Cull has an ability to carve a perfect path for his characters, making sure that they take it and reach their destination; it is also showcased through  easy-flowing prose that doesn’t spend its time being muddle with irrelevant information. And this is why it is such a pleasure to read his work. He is a driver who promises to get you to a place in a certain amount of time and delivers.

Remains is everything you look for in a novel, and definitely one that should be going straight into everyone’s book pile.

⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ out of ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

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