Interview with Red Cape Publishing’s Peter and Leanne Blakey-Novis

Ahead of the release and online book launch of their new anthology, B is for Beasts, The Horror Club speaks to Peter and Leanne Blakey-Novis, publishers of Red Cape Publishing, about the book, its launch, horror in general, among other things. Have a read below: Tell me about your A-Z of Horror series? Why did... Continue Reading →

REVIEW: The Devil’s Dreamland: Poetry Inspired by H.H. Holmes

Poetry is hard to write. Good poetry is even harder to write. If you add in a horror element, it just makes it that much more difficult. In today’s publishing landscape, it’s an underdeveloped genre, mainly due to the awe of having to write it. And then comes The Devil’s Dreamland: Poetry Inspired by H.H.... Continue Reading →

REVIEW: Andrew Cull’s Remains

The last time The Horror Club had the experience of reading Andrew Cull’s work was his short story, Hope and Walker, and it was a pleasant surprise that we gave five stars. Next up is his debut novel, Remains, which tells the story of Lucy, a mother trying to recover from the trauma of losing... Continue Reading →

REVIEW: Siphon

A.A. Medina offered us an insight into his style with his short story collection ITCH, and his work with Dustin Schyler Yoak on the wonderful magazine, Aphotic Realm. With SIPHON comes Medina's first venture into a full blown work, such as a novella/novel. It tells the story of Dr. Gary Phillips, the resident hematopathologist at Claybrook Medical... Continue Reading →

REVIEW: Occasional Beasts

Short Story Collections allow writers to have a larger scope, in which they can mix a number of different genres into one overlapping work, giving the reader a taste of different kind of stories. John Claude Smith's Occasional Beasts is an example of this. However, the one key aspect of Smith's collection is consistency. Too... Continue Reading →

REVIEW: That Which Grows Wild

Short Story Collections can be tricky. The author must find a perfect balance with each story, and in a way, each of them must complement one another. That Which Grows Wild offers us sixteen tales, each unique in their own way, of dark and wild fiction. Eric J. Guignard is no doubt a talented writer, backed up... Continue Reading →

Blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑